Alumna Koritha Mitchell Discusses "Living with Lynching: African American Lynching Plays, Performance, and Citizenship, 1890 - 1930" at the Library of Congress

March 5, 2014

Alumna Koritha Mitchell discusses and signs copies of "Living with Lynching: African American Lynching Plays, Performance, and Citizenship, 1890 - 1930" at the Library of Congress. 

From the Library of Congress:

"In her book, "Living with Lynching: African American Lynching Plays, Performance, and Citizenship, 1890-1930," Koritha Mitchell tells the story of black authors who wrote plays about lynching, in the 1910s and 1920s, and provided their communities with scripts that affirmed their self-conceptions and encouraged them to mourn their losses."

"Mitchell explores the ways in which the lynching plays and performances helped the African-American community survive the height of mob violence, and its photographic representation, still believing in its members’ rights to full citizenship. A literary historian and cultural critic, Mitchell is also an associate professor of English at the Ohio State University, where her research centers on African-American literature, racial violence in U.S. literature and contemporary culture, and black drama and performance. She examines how written and performed texts have helped terrorized families and communities survive and thrive."

For more information visit: http://www.loc.gov/today/pr/2014/14-041.html?loclr=rssloc&utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter