Democracy Then & Now: Rhondda Thomas, “Of Slaves, Sharecroppers, and Convicts: Unsettling Clemson University’s History”

November 7, 2016
3:30 - 5:00 PM
2115 Tawes Hall

Rhondda Thomas: Associate Professor Department of English, Clemson University

“Of Slaves, Sharecroppers, and Convicts: Unsettling Clemson University’s History”

This talk examines the unsettling of Clemson University’s sanitized approach to history through a scholar-activist’s recovery of the stories of enslaved and sharecropping African Americans who labored on the land—John C. Calhoun’s Fort Hill Plantation—upon which the institution was built by a predominately African American convict labor crew; Clemson student activists’ demands to the administration for greater transparency and a more diverse and inclusive community; and the Clemson Trustees’ consciousness awakening experience regarding Clemson history during debates that led to the removal of the Confederate flag from the statehouse grounds following the Charleston 9 massacre.

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For more information contact: Kim Coles (kcoles@umd.edu)