Job Placement

The Graduate Placement Director, Professor Kellie Robertson, works with students in all aspects of professional development and placement. You can contact him via email.

The Director of Graduate Placement and the department's Placement Committee assist students with the academic job search as well as job options outside of the academy. We maintain a departmental website with complete information about the job search process, including the basic protocols, timelines, advice for academic and non-academic job searches, and other relevant materials. Enrolled graduate students should contact the Director to be given access to this site.

Preparation for the academic job search begins in the spring semester, when the Director convenes a meeting for PhD candidates who intend to conduct an academic job search in the following school year. Providing practical and moral support through the long process of searching for an academic job, the Director meets individually with all job candidates and, with the Placement Committee, reviews all materials that candidates prepare for the search (including letters of application, curriculum vitae, dissertation abstracts, and statements of teaching philosophy). The Placement Committee also conducts mock interviews and arranges for mock job talks for job seekers. 

The national visibility of our graduate program, the excellence of our students, and our commitment to graduate-student mentoring have contributed to our excellent job placement record. Our students take jobs at public and private research universities, regional comprehensive state universities, liberal arts colleges, and community colleges. Some have received prestigious post-doctoral appointments such as those funded by the American Council of Learned Societies.

The Director also works closely with the ARHU Career Development Center in helping students to explore employment opportunities in the public and private sectors. Several of our PhD students have gone on to careers in the alternative academic sector at non-profit organizations, cultural heritage foundations, advocacy centers, and federal agencies (such as the National Endowment for the Humanities), a process facilitated by the University of Maryland’s ties to the institutional culture of Washington, DC.