Recent Trends in Comparative Literature

 

2015-16: Comparative Literarture Colloquium

Please join the Program in Comparative Literature for a graduate colloquium, open to students and faculty from all units. 

To access the readings and the syllabus, please go to our Blackboard site: https://www.english.umd.edu/academics/cmlt/events/discourse. If you are not formally enrolled in the colloquium, the password for the readings page is "Comparative".

 

For more information, and for the password to the readings site, please contact Dr. Sheila Jelen (sjelen@umd.edu).

 

Upcoming Events

Fri Mar 30

3:00 PM

Thu Nov 8

Fri Nov 9

News

February 15, 2018
The English Department is delighted to announce that Professor David Simon will be joining us this fall as Assistant Professor of English at the University of Maryland.
February 6, 2018
John Macintosh recently presented two papers, “Abstraction and/as Catachresis in Don DeLillo’s Cosmopolis” at Intersections of Finance and Society at City College London, and “Who Is Precarious Now?” at the Modern Language Association's 2018 convention.
February 6, 2018
Jonathan Williams's article, "Deathly Sentimentalism: Sarah Fielding, Henry Mackenzie," is in print in Eighteenth-Century Fiction 30.2 (Winter 2017-2018).
February 6, 2018
Some of Joshua Weiner's "Trumpoems" showed up in Lana Turner, the journal edited by Calvin Bedient, as well as in Tikkun magazine, and the journal, Scoundrel Time, which can be viewed here.
February 6, 2018
Lyra Hilliard has received a 2017-2018 CCCC Emergent Researcher Award of $10,000 for her project “Cross-Institutional Study of Communities of Inquiry in Blended and Online Composition.” Lyra is researching to what extent online and blended writing courses function as communities of inquiry and how the community of inquiry framework is applicable to Writing Studies. 
February 6, 2018
Peter Witte's drawings were published on The Florida Review's "Aquifer." The drawings, excerpted from Peter's project called "After Kafka," explore and are inspired by Franz Kafka's shorter works.
February 6, 2018
Robert Lucci will present his paper “Staring Down the Panopticon: Surveillance and Resisting the Controls of Whiteness, Chester Himes and If He Hollers, Let Him Go” at both the Frederick Douglass Institute’s 2018 Bicentennial Conference and the 2018 MELUS conference.
February 6, 2018
Kent Cartwright is in his second of two years as a Visiting Scholar at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice. In November, he gave a talk there at conference on “The City in Elizabethan Comedy,” along with three other public talks at Ca’ Foscari in November and December on topics that included Shakespeare comedy and the history of close reading. In October, he also gave a talk on comedy at a Shakespeare conference at the University of Cambridge. His essay on “Time in Shakespearean Comedy" will appear in February in a volume on Temporality, Genre and Experience in the Age of Shakespeare, edited by Lauren Shohet (Arden Bloomsbury), and the next issue of Shakespeare Newsletter will feature his reflection on the July 2016 performance of The Merchant of Venice in the Jewish Ghetto in Venice.
February 6, 2018
On Oct. 1, 2017, Michael Olmert was on the Talkback panel after Harold Pinter's two one-act plays, The Lover and The Collection, at The Shakespeare Theatre in Washington. Olmert was also asked by Yale University Press to vet the publication of Alberto Manguel's latest book, Packing My Library: An Elegy and Ten Digressions.. This is the second of Manguel's very fine books Olmert has reviewed for Yale. 
February 5, 2018
The D.C. Bar chose a Mock Trial Problem written by Robin Earnest for its 2018 competition. The Problem, entitled, Rally v. Riot: When Words Ignite, involves an analysis of potential First Amendment, and related violations, resulting from a school rally turned riotous. The mock trial will be conducted by the Bar on March 17, 2018.
January 17, 2018
On Saturday, Jan. 20 at 6 p.m. at Politics & Prose, Maud Casey, Bill Beverly, and Amber Sparks will participate in a Tribute to Denis Johnson, celebrating the recent publication of Johnson's posthumous collection The Largesse of the Sea Maiden.
November 29, 2017
Join us on Monday, December 11 at 7:30pm, as we celebrate the genius of Emily Dickinson with scholar and poet Sandra Gilbert. This third reading in the 2017/18 O.B. Hardison Poetry Series is co-sponsored with The Poetry Society of America.
November 6, 2017
Jimenez Hall, Room 2123 2:00PM - 3:13PM The French Department's guest Fall lecturer, Pamela A. Pears, will be giving a talk on "The Recto-Verso Effect”: Covering Assia Djebar and Malika Mokeddem in Contemporary France".  Pears is Professor of French at Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland. She has published on francophone Maghrebian and Vietnamese writers and filmmakers, including Abedllatif Kechiche, Kateb Yacine, Ly Thu Ho, Yamina Mechakra, Nina Bouraoui, and Assia Djebar. Her most recent book is Front Cover: Iconography and Algerian Women’s Writing: Heuristic Implications of the Recto-Verso Effect (Lexington Books, 2015).
November 1, 2017
(SUB)URBAN Curated by Matthew McLaughlin Featuring work by Amze Emmons, Yoonmi Nam, Benjamin Rogers, Nick Satinover, Christine Buckton Tillman, and Sang-Mi Yoo. October 30–December 16, 2017     Opening Reception Wednesday, November 1, 5–7 pm, Free and Open to the Public  This fall, the Stamp Gallery at the University of Maryland, College Park, presents (Sub)Urban, an exhibition presenting works by six contemporary artists who question the reality of suburban and urban contexts through humor, satire, and irony. Through a combination of print, painting, installation, and sculpture, (Sub)Urban explores our contemporary surroundings and the underlying psychology of our modern living environments. These artists work in varying media, but their underlying interests coalesce around our diverse experiences of space, identity, consumption, and labor as immigrants, transplants, and minorities living in the contemporary built environment of late capitalism. They examine items from our houses and our streets, presenting them in new ways and bringing new associations to them, and in the process they uncover unexpected narratives that shape the ways we dwell within the rush of modern life. The exhibition is curated by Matthew McLaughlin.(Sub)Urban is on view at the Stamp Gallery at the University of Maryland, College Park, October 30 through December 16, 2017. An opening reception will take place on November 1, 5–7pm, in the Stamp Gallery. This event is free and open to the public.
October 23, 2017
 For 49 seasons, the O.B. Hardison Poetry series has brought some of the best writers and speakers to the Folger stage. From traditional poetry readings to multimedia presentations to eclectic combinations of lecture, conversation, and performance, we are committed to expanding the contexts in which poetry is experienced.Learn more about the O.B. Hardison Poetry Series.
September 19, 2017
We invite proposals for scholarly papers and panels at TRANSFORMING QUEER, the 11th Annual DC Queer Studies Symposium at the University of Maryland. The symposium will be a daylong series of conversations about the history, present, and future of trans and queer studies, bringing together scholars and artists whose work stands at the intersection of both.
June 29, 2017
Tracy K. Smith, who read at Maryland as part of the Writers Here & Now Series, was recently named the new US Poet Laureate.
April 25, 2017
Four of our students in the English Department were selected to be Senior Marshals: Elizabeth Caldera, Casey DeFrancesco, Melissa Eck, and Emmy Schafer. These students will help lead the procession at the main campus commencement ceremony, and will also be honored at a reception.
April 21, 2017
There has never been a more important time for Terps to continue leading the way on climate action and sustainability. Protecting our Earth requires a year round commitment and Earth Day provides a unique and fun-filled opportunity to celebrate and recognize the work being done for a better planet and environment. 
February 15, 2018
The English Department is delighted to announce that Professor David Simon will be joining us this fall as Assistant Professor of English at the University of Maryland.
February 6, 2018
John Macintosh recently presented two papers, “Abstraction and/as Catachresis in Don DeLillo’s Cosmopolis” at Intersections of Finance and Society at City College London, and “Who Is Precarious Now?” at the Modern Language Association's 2018 convention.
February 6, 2018
Jonathan Williams's article, "Deathly Sentimentalism: Sarah Fielding, Henry Mackenzie," is in print in Eighteenth-Century Fiction 30.2 (Winter 2017-2018).
February 6, 2018
Some of Joshua Weiner's "Trumpoems" showed up in Lana Turner, the journal edited by Calvin Bedient, as well as in Tikkun magazine, and the journal, Scoundrel Time, which can be viewed here.
February 6, 2018
Lyra Hilliard has received a 2017-2018 CCCC Emergent Researcher Award of $10,000 for her project “Cross-Institutional Study of Communities of Inquiry in Blended and Online Composition.” Lyra is researching to what extent online and blended writing courses function as communities of inquiry and how the community of inquiry framework is applicable to Writing Studies. 
February 6, 2018
Peter Witte's drawings were published on The Florida Review's "Aquifer." The drawings, excerpted from Peter's project called "After Kafka," explore and are inspired by Franz Kafka's shorter works.
February 6, 2018
Robert Lucci will present his paper “Staring Down the Panopticon: Surveillance and Resisting the Controls of Whiteness, Chester Himes and If He Hollers, Let Him Go” at both the Frederick Douglass Institute’s 2018 Bicentennial Conference and the 2018 MELUS conference.
February 6, 2018
Kent Cartwright is in his second of two years as a Visiting Scholar at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice. In November, he gave a talk there at conference on “The City in Elizabethan Comedy,” along with three other public talks at Ca’ Foscari in November and December on topics that included Shakespeare comedy and the history of close reading. In October, he also gave a talk on comedy at a Shakespeare conference at the University of Cambridge. His essay on “Time in Shakespearean Comedy" will appear in February in a volume on Temporality, Genre and Experience in the Age of Shakespeare, edited by Lauren Shohet (Arden Bloomsbury), and the next issue of Shakespeare Newsletter will feature his reflection on the July 2016 performance of The Merchant of Venice in the Jewish Ghetto in Venice.
February 6, 2018
On Oct. 1, 2017, Michael Olmert was on the Talkback panel after Harold Pinter's two one-act plays, The Lover and The Collection, at The Shakespeare Theatre in Washington. Olmert was also asked by Yale University Press to vet the publication of Alberto Manguel's latest book, Packing My Library: An Elegy and Ten Digressions.. This is the second of Manguel's very fine books Olmert has reviewed for Yale. 
February 5, 2018
The D.C. Bar chose a Mock Trial Problem written by Robin Earnest for its 2018 competition. The Problem, entitled, Rally v. Riot: When Words Ignite, involves an analysis of potential First Amendment, and related violations, resulting from a school rally turned riotous. The mock trial will be conducted by the Bar on March 17, 2018.