Restoration and 18th Century

Our Restoration and eighteenth-century area group offers courses and independent work in the novel, drama and the theater, poetry, periodical literature, satire, and prose.  We offer particular strengths in genre studies (the novel, drama, satire), historicism, cultural studies, gender and women’s writing, race and African-British writing, authorship and textuality, the history of science, sexuality studies, and the global eighteenth century.  Core faculty include Vincent Carretta, Laura Rosenthal, and Tita Chico.  We are also fortunate to have colleagues specializing in the seventeenth century—Marshall Grossman and Jerry Passanante—as well as colleagues in Romanticism—Neil Fraistat and Orrin Wang—who have made vital contributions to MA and PhD projects in eighteenth-century studies.  Ralph Bauer, as well as Vincent Carretta, opens up our area to transatlantic studies.  We also benefit from strong colleagues in our department and the college who study gender, sexuality, race, history, art history, and theater.

One of the most important journals in eighteenth-century studies is housed at the University of Maryland (and at the University of Illinois). The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation is edited by Professor Tita Chico. Published quarterly, ECTI fosters theoretical and interpretive research on all aspects of Western culture, 1660-1800, and takes special interest in essays that apply innovative contemporary methodologies to the study of eighteenth-century literature, history, science, fine arts, and popular culture. Advanced graduate students specializing in the field of eighteenth-century studies at the University of Maryland have the opportunity to learn about academic publishing by working as editorial assistants for the journal.   

We are fortunate to be located in an area with considerable resources for primary research. The Folger Shakespeare Library and the Library of Congress have significant holdings in 18th-century literature and culture. Additionally, the Folger Institute (at the Folger Shakespeare Library) regularly holds seminars and workshops of interest to scholars working in eighteenth-century studies.  Graduate students can take Folger seminars, as well as courses with local consortium schools, for credit.  The eighteenth-century reading group, which meets regularly throughout the year, provides the opportunity for faculty and students to exchange work and share ideas on a particular project.  Sometimes we blog about these discussions with a wider community of eighteenth-century scholars here.  We regularly invite guest speakers to present their current work.  Recent guests have included Joseph Roach, Robert Markley, Lyndon Dominique, and Srinivas Aravamuden (scheduled for 08-09).

Our Faculty

Faculty Bookshelf

,Of Garden Mounts
Colonial Williamsburg,2014
,Atlantic Worlds in the Long Eighteenth Century: Seduction and Sentiment
Palgrave Macmillan,2012
,Phillis Wheatley: Biography of a Genius in Bondage
University of Georgia Press,2011
Journal Editor,The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation
Penn Press,2011
Co-Editor,Literary Study, Measurement, and the Sublime: Disciplinary Assessment
The Teagle Foundation ,2010
,Kitchens, Smokehouses, and Privies: Outbuildings and the Architecture of Daily Life in the Eighteenth-Century Mid-Atlantic
Cornell University Press,2009
,Nightwalkers: Prostitute Narratives from the Eighteenth Century
Broadview Press,2008
,Equiano, the African: Biography of a Self-Made Man
Penguin,2006
,Infamous Commerce: Prostitution in Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Culture
Cornell University Press,2006
,Designing Women: The Dressing Room in Eighteenth-Century English Literature and Culture
,2005
Editor,Unchained Voices: An Anthology of Black Authors in the English-Speaking World of the Eighteenth Century
University Press of Kentucky,2003
,The Smithsonian Book of Books
Smithsonian Books,2003
Editor,The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings, by Olaudah Equiano
Penguin, Revised and Expanded Edition,2003
Co-editor, with Mita Choudhury,Monstrous Dreams of Reason: Body, Self, and Other in the Enlightenment
Bucknell University Press,2002
Editor,Complete Writings, by Phillis Wheatley
Penguin,2001
Editor,Thoughts and Sentiments on the Evil of Slavery, by Quobna Ottobah Cugoano
Penguin,1999
,Official Guide to Colonial Williamsburg
Colonial Williamsburg,1998
,Playwrights and Plagiarists in Early Modern England
Cornell University Press,1996
,Milton's Teeth and Ovid's Umbrella: Curiouser and Curiouser Adventures in History
Touchstone Publishing,1995

Upcoming Events

News

September 12, 2016
The English Department is a certified Green Office within the University, which means that our department does its part in order to help the University be more sustainable. The UMD Sustainability Fund currently has $390,000 available for projects that promote environmental sustainability and positively impact the student experience at UMD.
September 12, 2016
Jess Enoch was the keynote speaker at the Naylor Conference for Undergraduate Research at York College in York, Pennsylvania (Sept. 9-11). She presented with two of her students from the spring 2016 semester Keith Wise and Sean McGovern. Their presentation "Reflections on Method: Undergraduate Research and Digital Transcription" discussed the digital transcription project of Madge Preston's diaries that students completed in Enoch's spring's course Women in Public Memory in Material and Digital Worlds. Additionally, Jess Enoch was a featured speaker at the Humanities Lecture Series at York College on Sept. 8th where she  presented "Remembering (and Forgetting) Women: Exploring Complexities of the Public Memory Archive." 
September 12, 2016
Oak Knoll Press has recently published The Daniel Press and The Garland of Rachel by Bill and Sylvia Peterson (both former faculty), an account of a small private press operated by an Oxford don near the end of the nineteenth century. The Garland of Rachel (1881) is a collection of poetic tributes to Henry and Emily Daniel's one-year-old daughter, and today it is regarded as one of the most sought-after of Victorian rare books.
September 8, 2016
The English Department hosted its annual Welcome Assembly on September 7th. Faculty, staff, and students gathered to hear introductions, announcements, and news of plans for the year ahead. Following the formal program in Ulrich Hall was a brunch reception on the third floor patio.
September 7, 2016
Brian Richardson’s article, “Modern Fiction, the Poetics of Lists, and the Boundaries of Narrative,” was published in Style 50 (2016) 327-41. He read a paper in a panel he organized and chaired on “Antiworlds and Unnatural Narrative Theory” at the International Conference on Narrative in Amsterdam in June. He also served as an evaluator for a new international PhD program based at the University of Lisbon.
September 7, 2016
Emily Mitchell has been asked to participate in the PEN/Faulkner Writers in the Schools program.
September 7, 2016
Joshua Weiner's Berlin Notebook, prose about the refugee crisis, will be published this fall by the Los Angeles Review of Books. An outtake from it appeared in the summer issue of The Threepenny Review. Keep reading to learn more.
September 7, 2016
Emily Flamm (MFA '13) received second place and $500 in Carve Magazine's Raymond Carver Short Story Contest. Her story, "Come Down to the Water," will be published in the fall issue.
September 2, 2016
Alumna and PWP lecturer Kara Pleasants and her husband were awarded the curatorship of a historic property in Susquehanna State Park last fall. This summer, the couple began the restoration project. 
September 2, 2016
In June, Kellie Robertson spoke at a symposium hosted by the Institut d'études avancées in Paris entitled “Le Roman de la Rose et la philosophie parisienne au XIIIe siècle.” Her talk was entitled “Horace’s Pitchfork and Nature’s Ax.” Keep reading to learn more!