UMD at MLA 2017

January 4, 2017

The Modern Language Association's Annual Convention is being held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from January 5th through the 8th. Those presenting from the Department include faculty members and graduate students.

January 5, 2017

5. Preconvention Workshop for Job Seekers in Foreign Languages
Thursday, 5 January, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m., 201B, Pennsylvania Convention Center
Program arranged by the ADFL Executive Committee
Presiding: Karen A. Stolley, Emory University
Speakers: Stacy Hartman, MLA; Omar Ka, Univ. of Maryland Baltimore County; Denise McCracken, St. Charles Community Coll., MO; William Nichols, Georgia State Univ.; Gary Bruce Schmidt, Coastal Carolina Univ.

Session Description: Representatives of different institutional types discuss work and careers in AA-, BA-, MA-, and PhD-granting programs and institutions, as well as nonteaching academic opportunities. Speakers address institutional expectations; navigating a complex market; the application dossier; convention, Skype, and on-campus interviews; positions off the tenure track; and negotiating an offer.

48. Fandom and Reception Studies
Thursday, 5 January, 1:45-3:00 p.m., 305-306, Philadelphia Marriott
Program arranged by the Reception Study Society
Presiding: Daniel Charles Morris, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette

1. "Victorian Fan Fiction and Its Readers," Carrie Sickmann Han, Indiana Univ.–Purdue Univ., Indianapolis
2. "Merchandising and Cosplay in the 1890s," Erica Haugtvedt, Ohio State Univ., Columbus
3. "Emily Dickinson, Music Geek," Gerard Holmes, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
4. "Ectostory Interaction: The Confluence of Reception, Fandom, and Cognitive Flexibility," Rhona Trauvitch, Florida International Univ.

71. Speed Mentoring for Job Seekers in Foreign Languages
Thursday, 5 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 201B, Pennsylvania Convention Center
Program arranged by the ADFL Executive Committee
Presiding: Ming-Bao Yue, Univ. of Hawai'i , Mānoa

Speakers: Marc L. Greenberg, Univ. of Kansas; Stacy Hartman, MLA; William H. Hinrichs, Bard High School Early College, NY; Omar Ka, Univ. of Maryland Baltimore County; Elise C. Leahy, Jr., Southern Utah Univ.; Denise McCracken, St. Charles Community Coll., MO; Charlotte Ann Melin, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities; William Nichols, Georgia State Univ.; Gary Bruce Schmidt, Coastal Carolina Univ.; Karen A. Stolley, Emory Univ.

Session Description:
Speed mentoring offers small-group mentoring on the job search—inside and outside the academy—focusing on applying to and working in different types of institutions; preparing a dossier; Skype, convention, and on-campus interviews; and nonacademic humanities career paths. Speed mentoring is not intended to replace the one-on-one job counseling that can be scheduled at other times during the convention.

95. Astrology/Astronomy as Literature
Thursday, 5 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Franklin 12, Philadelphia Marriott
Program arranged by the forums CLCS Renaissance and Early Modern and TC Science and Literature
Presiding: Pamela Gossin, Univ. of Texas, Dallas

Speakers: Kristina Bross, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette; Tita Chico, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Judy A. Hayden, Univ. of Tampa; Chelsea McKelvey, Southern Methodist Univ.; Christine M. Probes, Univ. of South Florida; Katherine Walker, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Responding: Ralph Bauer, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

Session Description:
While modern scholars have often regarded early modern astrology as an aberration that had to be overcome until modern, "scientific" astronomy could be born, this session follows the lead of recent work by intellectual historians and reevaluates the important role that astrology occupied in early modern culture and literature, including scientific treatises, poetry, history, and drama.

115. Liberty Crack'd
Thursday, 5 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Franklin 8, Philadelphia Marriott
Program arranged by the forum LLC Chicana and Chicano
Presiding: Olga Herrera, Univ. of St. Thomas

1. "Homeland Insecurity; or, Un desmadre en Aztlán: Virginia Grise's Blu," Belinda Rincon, John Jay Coll. of Criminal Justice, City Univ. of New York
2. "Liberty Pursued: Central American Child Migration, Student Activism, and Rapid Responses," Ana Patricia Rodríguez, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
3. "Migrants as Criminals and Criminals as Migrants: Reimagining Jimmy Santiago Baca's United States Prison Literature as Transnational Literature," Victoria Tankersley, Univ. of St. Thomas

130. Treacherous Parisian Men: Linking Queerness and Alienation in Writing from France, the Maghreb, and the United States
Thursday, 5 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 308, Philadelphia Marriott
A special session
Presiding: Pamela A. Pears, Washington Coll.

1. "'Saint-Jenih': Taïa's Transfilial Alterity," Denis M. Provencher, Univ. of Arizona
2. "No Name in the Street for Passengers in the West: Nabile Farès, James Baldwin, and Conversations of Alienation," Valérie K. Orlando, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
3. "From Alienation to Activism: Richard Wright, Jean Genet, and the Black Panthers," Pamela A. Pears

148. What Is Critical Bibliography?
Thursday, 5 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 410, Philadelphia Marriott
Program arranged by the forum TM Bibliography and Scholarly Editing
Presiding: Ryan Cordell, Northeastern Univ.

Speakers: Barbara Heritage, Univ. of Virginia; Rachael King, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara; Matthew Kirschenbaum, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Nigel Lepianka, Texas A&M Univ., College Station; Caroline Wigginton, Univ. of Mississippi

Responding: Michael Suarez, Univ. of Virginia

Session Description:
Panelists explore the intellectual reach and possibilities for bibliography beyond textual criticism. How might bibliography intersect with other object-oriented disciplines? How should the field converse with literary and cultural theory? Do new scholarly technologies reorient bibliographic practice? What is the function of bibliography today?

185. Digital Frost
Thursday, 5 January, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 102A, Pennsylvania Convention Center
Program arranged by the Robert Frost Society
Presiding: Natalie E. Gerber, State Univ. of New York, Fredonia

Speakers: Jason Camlot, Concordia Univ.; Jay Satterfield, Dartmouth Coll. Library; Molly Schwartzburg, Univ. of Virginia; Lisa A. Seale, Univ. of Wisconsin Colls.; Donald Sheehy, Edinboro Univ. of Pennsylvania; Martha Nell Smith, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Setsuko Yokoyama, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

Session Description:
Panelists explore the prospects for a collaborative digital-humanities (DH) project for Robert Frost, its contents and partners. Speakers include scholars, editors, and special-collection librarians working with Frost and DH leaders who can speak to the potential, hurdles, and ideal architecture of such a project.

January 6, 2017

208. Ecological Catastrophe: Past and Present
Friday, 6 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 411-412, Philadelphia Marriott
Program arranged by the forums LLC Middle English and TC Ecocriticism and Environmental Humanities
Presiding: Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, George Washington Univ.

Speakers: Alison Glassie, Univ. of Virginia; Dana Luciano, Georgetown Univ.; Kellie Robertson, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Roy Scranton, Univ. of Notre Dame; Corey Sparks, California State Univ., Chico; Karl Steel, Brooklyn Coll., City Univ. of New York; Tom White, Univ. of London, Birkbeck

Session Description:
How do we read ecological catastrophe across periods? This session gathers medievalists, early modernists, and contemporary scholars to consider how cataclysm is often invoked to establish secure periodizations yet typically undermines easy temporal segregations. Panelists consider representations of ecological crisis, natural disasters and degradation, and apocalyptic images and rhetoric.

228. Rethinking the Transnational Turn in American Literature
Friday, 6 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 203B, Pennsylvania Convention Center
A special session
Presiding: Yogita Goyal, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

Speakers: Jessica Berman, Univ. of Maryland Baltimore County; Russ Castronovo, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison; John Alba Cutler, Northwestern Univ.; Wai Chee Dimock, Yale Univ.; Shelley Fisher Fishkin, Stanford Univ.; David James, Univ. of London, Queen Mary Coll.; Johannes Voelz, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität

Session Description:
Panelists look at the literary methods entailed by the transnational turn in American literature. This session takes stock of the limits and possibilities of transnationalism not by repeating earlier claims but by focusing on a single keyword, period, or field and assessing its value for American literature.

235. Female Authorship in Eighteenth- and Early-Nineteenth-Century German Culture
Friday, 6 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 405, Philadelphia Marriott
Program arranged by the forum LLC 18th- and Early-19th-Century German
Presiding: Elisabeth Krimmer, Univ. of California, Davis

1. "'Ein andrer Welttheil wird mein Vaterland': German Émigrés in Charlotte Schiller's Novels," Gaby H. Pailer, Univ. of British Columbia
2. "Intellectual Incursions: Benedikte Naubert and the Emergent Disciplines of History and Orientalism," Julie Koser, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
3. "Telling Stories: Women Writers Employ the Märchenoma," Julie Koehler, Wayne State Univ.
4. "The Female Body in Louise Aston's and Fanny Lewald's Works through the Prism of Romantic Dialogue," Renata Fuchs, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

295. Future(s) of South Asian Literary Studies
Friday, 6 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Franklin 12, Philadelphia Marriott
A special session
Presiding: Sangeeta Ray, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

Speakers: Deepika Bahri, Emory Univ.; Mrinalini Chakravorty, Univ. of Virginia; Ben Conisbee Baer, Princeton Univ.; Ankhi Mukherjee, Univ. of Oxford; Ulka Anjara, Brandeis Univ.

Session Description:
Panelists discuss reasons for the decline in interest in South Asian literature in English and other languages. As writers, scholars, and critics, how do we engage with this literature? What questions are we not generating to revitalize the field? What can we learn from scholars in African, postcolonial, and world literature to reinvigorate our field?

320. Cold War Racial Forms: Reading across Nations in the Global Conflict
Friday, 6 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 104A, Pennsylvania Convention Center
A special session
Presiding: Mary-Helen Washington, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

1. "Red Blues: Racial Longing in the Cold War Musical Silk Stockings," Kate Baldwin, Northwestern Univ.
2. "Richard Wright and the Empire of Cold War Liberal Pluralism: Race and American Expansion after World War II," Joseph Keith, Binghamton Univ., State Univ. of New York
3. "Revolutionary Blackness in the Soviet Imaginary: Reading Victor Koretsky's Posters," Jonathan Flatley, Wayne State Univ.
4. "The Unyielding Earth: Women of Color Feminism and Cold War Fictions," Crystal Parikh, New York Univ.

366. Shapes of the English Major Today
Friday, 6 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 105B, Pennsylvania Convention Center
Program arranged by the ADE Ad Hoc Committee on the English Major
Presiding: Doug Steward, MLA

Speakers: Kent Cartwright, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Sarah E. Chinn, Hunter Coll., City Univ. of New York; David Laurence, MLA; Tarshia Stanley, Spelman Coll.

Session Description:
Members of the committee discuss their progress toward describing and assessing changes departments have made to the English major or that are under consideration, especially as they respond to disciplinary realignment, student needs, and declines in the number of undergraduates declaring English as a major.

388. Postcolonial Affect
Friday, 8 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 18B, ACC
Program arranged by the forum TC Postcolonial Studies
Presiding: Nicholas Mainey Brown, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago
1. "Ecology of Intimacies: An Ethics, Aesthetics, and Politics of Reading The Hungry Tide and The Whale Caller," Sangeeta Ray, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
2. "City Genre, Urban Government," John Marx, Univ. of California, Davis
3. "Affecting History," Vilashini Cooppan, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz

January 7, 2016

444. Infinite Jest at Twenty
Saturday, 7 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 112A, Pennsylvania Convention Center
A special session
Presiding: Gerry Canavan, Marquette Univ.

1. "Infinite Jest's Near Future," Lee Konstantinou, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
2. "Aesthetics of Trauma in Infinite Jest," Carrie Shanafelt, Fairleigh Dickinson Univ., Teaneck
3. "No Year of Glad: Infinite Jest after 9/13/2008," Gerry Canavan

Responding: N. Katherine Hayles, Duke Univ.

459. Race, Religion, and Form in Spenser and Milton
Saturday, 7 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 203B, Pennsylvania Convention Center
Program arranged by the Milton Society of America and the International Spenser Society
Presiding: Melissa E. Sanchez, Univ. of Pennsylvania

1. "Maybe She's Born with It: On the Hair Color of Spenser's Una and Milton's Eve," Eric Song, Swarthmore Coll.
2. "Lyric Orientalism from Spenser to Milton," Ayesha Ramachandran, Yale Univ.
3. "'Not Mingled with the Bodie': Religion, Race, and the Nature of Soul in Spenser and Milton," Kimberly Anne Coles, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

475. Graphic Style and Big Data
Saturday, 7 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 104A, Pennsylvania Convention Center
Program arranged by the forum LLC 20th- and 21st-Century American
Presiding: Amy Hungerford, Yale Univ.

1. "Illusions of Progress: Visualization and the Politics of Stylized Time," Ed Finn, Arizona State Univ.
2. "Excavating the Present: Richard McGuire’s Here and the Wayback Machine," Alexander Manshel, Stanford Univ.
3. "Chris Ware and R. Crumb: From Data to Disgust," Rebecca Clark, Univ. of California, Berkeley
4. "The Visual Universalism of Bing Xu’s Book from the Ground," Lee Konstantinou, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

481. Making It New: Criticism and Method in a Global Textual Ecosystem
Saturday, 7 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 103A, Pennsylvania Convention Center
Program arranged by the forum LLC 20th- and 21st-Century English and Anglophone
Presiding: Priya Joshi, Temple Univ., Philadelphia

Speakers: James F. English, Univ. of Pennsylvania; Lisa Gitelman, New York Univ.; Peter J. Kalliney, Univ. of Kentucky; Matthew Kirschenbaum, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

Session Description:
“The greater complexity of social relations demand of modern literature new literary tools,” urged Georg Lukács. Complexities Lukács observed in the 1950s today include economic and material conditions that call for new analytic algorithms. Participants explore current critical methods at a moment when criticism and method appear to be under siege or, worse, irrelevant.

511. Disability and Pedagogy
Saturday, 7 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Grand Ballroom Salon I, Philadelphia Marriott
Program arranged by the MLA Committee on Disability Issues in the Profession and the MLA Committee on the Status of Graduate Students in the Profession
Presiding: Stacey Amo, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge

1. "Interdependency: What We Don’t Talk about When We Talk about Accessible Pedagogies," Adam Newman, Emory Univ.
2. "Compulsory Health and Chronically Ill Existence," Sarah Orem, Smith Coll.
3. "Caring for the Self and the Student: The Importance of Sustainability in Accessibility Best Practices," Ruth Osorio, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

533. Comparative Studies in the Age of the Global Anglophone
Saturday, 7 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Franklin 9, Philadelphia Marriott
Program arranged by the forum CLCS 20th- and 21st-Century
Presiding: Sangeeta Ray, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

 

Speakers: Elliott Colla, Georgetown Univ.; Toral Gajarawala, New York Univ.; Peter James Hitchcock, Baruch Coll., City Univ. of New York; Anjali Prabhu, Wellesley Coll.; Anthony Reed, Yale Univ.; Rebecca L. Walkowitz, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

 

Session Description:
Participants take up the question of the place of comparative literary studies in the face of an increasingly global anglophone literary and academic marketplace. What is the relation between global and world literature and comparative literature?

580. Trust in Literature: Seventeenth-Century Horizons
Saturday, 7 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 202B, Pennsylvania Convention Center
Program arranged by the forum LLC 17th-Century English
Presiding: Julia Reinhard Lupton, Univ. of California, Irvine

1. "Thinking Trust through Literature in John Donne," Joseph Sterrett, Aarhus Univ.
2. "Trust in Money: Weak Sovereignty and Sympathetic Economies in Measure for Measure," Amanda Bailey, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
3. "'Then Face to Face': Timing Trust in Macbeth," Jennifer Elizabeth Waldron, Univ. of Pittsburgh

595. Transpacific Archives and Methods
Saturday, 7 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 104B, Pennsylvania Convention Center
Program arranged by the forum LLC 19th-Century American
Presiding: Hsuan L. Hsu, Univ. of California, Davis

1. "Transoceanic Thinking and the Literary Pacific," Michelle Burnham, Santa Clara Univ.
2. "Being Cold in the Pacific," Nan Da, Univ. of Notre Dame
3. "Tracing the Transpacific Childhood of Sui Sin Far’s Mother," Mary A. M. Chapman, Univ. of British Columbia

Responding: Edlie L. Wong, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

600A. Extraordinary Bodies at Twenty
Saturday, 7 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Grand Ballroom Salon I, Philadelphia Marriott
A special session
Presiding: Adam Newman, Emory Univ.

Speakers: Allison Hobgood, Willamette Univ.; Julie Minich, Univ. of Texas, Austin; Clare Mullaney, Univ. of Pennsylvania; Ruth Osorio, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Amanda Stuckey, Coll. of William and Mary; Samuel Yates, George Washington Univ.

Responding: Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, Emory Univ.

Session Description:
Panelists take the twentieth anniversary of Rosemarie Garland-Thomson’s Extraordinary Bodies as an occasion to critically reflect on the continuing impact and influence of this text in the increasingly diverse field of literary disability studies today as well as in the development of the field over the past twenty years.

603. Queer Domesticities
Saturday, 7 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 304, Philadelphia Marriott
Program arranged by the forum TC Sexuality Studies
Presiding: Karma Lochrie, Indiana Univ., Bloomington; Martha Nell Smith, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

1. "Gertrude Stein and the Theater of Dinner," Elizabeth Blake, Cornell Univ.
2. "Queering Medieval Domesticity: Loving in a Marrying Kind of Way," Glenn D. Burger, Queens Coll., City Univ. of New York
3. "Queer Communities of Feeling and the All-Male Family in Mary Shelley’s Maurice and Valperga," Colin Carman, Colorado Mesa Univ.
4. "Spinster Sexuality and the Low Arts: Queer Sociability," Dana Seitler, Univ. of Toronto

611. Periodicals, Editorship, Race, and Ethnicity
Saturday, 7 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 111B, Pennsylvania Convention Center
A special session
Presiding: Eric S. Gardner, Saginaw Valley State Univ.

Speakers: Janet Galligani Casey, Skidmore Coll.; Jim Casey, Univ. of Delaware, Newark; Brooks E. Hefner, James Madison Univ.; Kelley Kreitz, Pace Univ., NY; Zita Nunes, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Sarah Salter, Texas A&M Univ., Corpus Christi

Session Description:
This session promotes conversations about editorship, authorship, and collaboration across historical periodicals and the boundaries of race and ethnicity. Panelists respond to important recent work on immigrant, Latin@, and African American print cultures that intersect in their attention to periodicals and the centrality of editorship and collaboration in our literary histories.

612. The Limits of the Numerical: New Roles for Literary Study
Saturday, 7 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Franklin 13, Philadelphia Marriott
A special session
Presiding: Christopher John Newfield, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

1. "Gender and Cultural Analytics: Finding or Making Stereotypes?" Laura C. Mandell, Texas A&M Univ., College Station
2. "The Rhetoric of Measurement against Itself," Heather Steffen, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
3. "Beyond the False Certainties of Impact Factors, Altmetrics, and Download Counts: Qualitative and Narrative Accounts of Scholarship," Frank Pasquale, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore

616. Queering the Borders of the Black Freedom Struggle: Archives, Histories, Aesthetics
Saturday, 7 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 102A, Pennsylvania Convention Center
A special session
Presiding: Marlon Bryan Ross, Univ. of Virginia

1. "Jorgensen’s Shadows," C. Riley Snorton, Cornell Univ.
2. "Experimental Leaders: Performance, Time, and the Queer Aesthetics of Civil Rights Leadership," Julius Fleming, Jr., Univ. of Maryland, College Park
3. "Recovering Perry Watkins: American Militarism, Queer Critique, and the Black Homonational," Khary Polk, Amherst Coll.

629. Ekphrasis in Medieval and Renaissance Italian Literature
Saturday, 7 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Franklin 10, Philadelphia Marriott
Program arranged by the forum LLC Medieval and Renaissance Italian
Presiding: Kristin Phillips-Court, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

1. "Frame as Ekphrasis in Enea Vico’s Book of Empresses," Susan Gaylard, Univ. of Washington, Seattle
2. "Ariosto’s Arabic; or, When Is an Ekphrasis Not an Ekphrasis?" Joseph M. Ortiz, Univ. of Texas, El Paso
3. "Castiglione’s Portrait and the Poetry of Self-Representation in the Elegia qua fingit Hippolyten," Joseph D. Falvo, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
4. "Between Art and Literature: Iconography and Petrarchan Ekphrasis," Kristen Ina Grimes, St. Joseph's Univ.

653. Chinese Science Fiction: Past, Present, Future
Saturday, 7 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Franklin 3, Philadelphia Marriott
Program arranged by the forums LLC East Asian and LLC Modern and Contemporary Chinese
Presiding: Christopher Tong, Univ. of Maryland Baltimore County

Speakers: Angie Chau, Arizona State Univ.; Cara Healey, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara; Nathaniel Isaacson, North Carolina State Univ.; Hua Li, Montana State Univ., Bozeman; Christopher Tong

Responding: Mingwei Song, Wellesley Coll.

Session Description:
Panelists examine such issues as utopia, nonhuman existence, and the environmental ramifications of contemporary and imagined future human life in the emergent field of science fiction in Chinese literature.

656. The Mexican Legal Code and Its Glitches
Saturday, 7 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 308, Philadelphia Marriott
Program arranged by the forums LLC Mexican and TC Law and the Humanities
Presiding: Emily Hind, Univ. of Florida; Peter Mallios, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

1. "Omnipresent Massacre and Absent Genocide in Julián Herbert’s La casa del dolor ajeno," Rebecca Janzen, Bluffton Coll.
2. "'Te tengo tanta ley': The Judicial System in Golden Age Mexican Cinema," Kevin Anzzolin, Worcester State Univ.
3. "Between Poetic License and Criminal Injustice in an Ethnographic Testimonio," Analisa Taylor, Univ. of Oregon

Responding: Ignacio Sanchez Prado, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

January 8, 2017

689. Fabulations from Below: Queer, Feminist, and Decolonial Speculative Worldings
Sunday, 8 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 106A, Pennsylvania Convention Center
A special session
Presiding: Shelley Streeby, Univ. of California, San Diego

Speakers: Aimee Bahng, Dartmouth Coll.; Stephanie LeMenager, Univ. of Oregon; Alexis Lothian, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Rebekah Sheldon, Indiana Univ., Bloomington

Session Description:
This session brings together scholars whose work engages with the ways that speculative fictions by and for feminists, queers, ecosexuals, and people of color have taken the genre’s boundary condition as a starting point for efforts to rewrite empire and find spaces of possibility within devastated futures, apocalyptic landscapes, and inhospitable utopias.

690. Critique and Its Limits
Sunday, 8 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 110B, Pennsylvania Convention Center
A special session
Presiding: Philip Gould, Brown Univ.

1. "A Hermeneutic of Citizenship," Sandra M. Gustafson, Univ. of Notre Dame
2. "Ethos and Critique," Amanda S. Anderson, Brown Univ.
3. "'Mere Literature': Between Deliberative and Agonistic Democracy," Peter Mallios, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

Responding: Philip Gould

694. Re-turns of Deconstruction
Sunday, 8 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 111A, Pennsylvania Convention Center
Program arranged by the forum TM Literary and Cultural Theory
Presiding: Tilottama Rajan, Univ. of Western Ontario

1. "Foucault's Inconstant Gaze: Archaeology and Criticism," William Donald Melaney, American Univ. in Cairo
2. "Beginning Again: Foucault and the Limit-Experience," Daniel Nutters, Temple Univ., Philadelphia
3. "Cave Dwelling: Derrida and the Prosthesis of the Inside," Orrin N. C. Wang, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
4. "Life without Power: Deconstructing the Postgenetic Concept of Deconstruction," Mauro Senatore, Diego Portales Univ.

697. Rethinking Reconstruction: Methods, Approaches, and Literatures
Sunday, 8 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 104B, Pennsylvania Convention Center
Program arranged by the forum LLC Late-19th- and Early-20th-Century American
Presiding: Edlie L. Wong, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

1. "Reconstructing Black Dignity," Jeannine DeLombard, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
2. "Native American Literature and the Lost Cause," Melanie Benson Taylor, Dartmouth Coll.
3. "The Importance of Reading the Literature of Reconstruction Closely," Brook Thomas, Univ. of California, Irvine
4. "The People's Court," Bryan Wagner, Univ. of California, Berkeley

703. Sand’s Searches Beyond
Sunday, 8 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 310, Philadelphia Marriott
Program arranged by the George Sand Association
Presiding: Maria G. Traub, Neumann Univ.

1. "Maneuvering beyond the Physical Boundaries: George Sand’s Métissage of Genres, from Jeanne (1844) to Histoire de ma vie (1854)," Laetitia Zembski, Univ. of Texas, Austin
2. "Beyond the Feminine Voice: Silence, Speech, and Hybridity in George Sand’s Indiana," Hannah Wegmann, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
3. "Sand's Literary, Mystical, and Artistic Dialogue—a Response: The Seven Strings of the Lyre," Maria G. Traub

713. Sound, Race, Text
Sunday, 8 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 406, Philadelphia Marriott
A special session
Presiding: Julius Fleming, Jr., Univ. of Maryland, College Park

1. "Black Static: Of Sound and Friction in the Black Atlantic," Edwin Hill, Univ. of Southern California
2. "Longfellow in Black: Samuel Coleridge-Taylor's 'Song of Hiawatha' and the Problem of the Twentieth Century," Tsitsi Jaji, Duke Univ.
3. "Shadows of Tomorrow: Rap Aesthetics and the Literary Representation of Post-Civil-Rights Temporality," Carter Mathes, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick
4. "The People’s Muse: Paul Robeson as Leitmotif," Shana Redmond, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

731. Sophie von La Roche and Female Authorship
Sunday, 8 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 404, Philadelphia Marriott
Program arranged by the forum LLC 18th- and Early-19th-Century German
Presiding: Julie Koser, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

1. "Sophie von La Roche und Goethe: Partners in a Literary Network of Sensibility (1772–75)," Monika Nenon, Univ. of Memphis
2. "Women Reading and Writing Women: Sophie von La Roche’s Pedagogical Fiction," Lauren Nossett, Elon Univ.
3. "Between Emancipation and Reaction: Sophie von La Roche and Her Translator Marie-Elisabeth de La Fite," Angela Sanmann, Université de Lausanne

 

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