UMD at MLA Austin 2016

January 5, 2016

The Modern Language Association's Annual Convention is being held in Austin, Texas from January 7th through the 10th. Those presenting from the Department include faculty members and graduate students.

January 7, 2016

3. Preconvention Workshop for Job Seekers in English
Thursday, 7 January, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m., 14, ACC
Program arranged by the ADE Executive Committee
Presiding: Kent Cartwright, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
Speakers: Scott Warren Klein, Wake Forest Univ.; Ian Sherman, Olympic Coll., WA; Tarshia Stanley, Spelman Coll.

Session Description: Representatives from different types of institutions discuss aspects of the job search, including career paths for tenure-track and non-tenure-track faculty members; letters of application and recommendation; curricula vitae; interviews at the convention, by Skype or phone, and on campus; multiyear job search strategies; and negotiating an offer.

19. From Canon to Archival Encounters
Thursday, 7 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 8C, ACC
Program arranged by the forum LLC 19th-Century American
Presiding: Rodrigo Lazo, Univ. of California, Irvine

1. "Slavery and the Archival Uncanny," Jennifer C. James, George Washington Univ.
2. "Tales of Archival Enterprise," Duncan F. Faherty, Queens Coll., City Univ. of New York
3. "Words Written Left Unsaid: Archival Excess in Latino Print Culture," Alberto Varon, Indiana Univ., Bloomington
4. "The Anthology as Archive," Robert S. Levine, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

41A. Assessment in Business Communication
Thursday, 7 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 10A, ACC
Program arranged by the Association for Business Communication
Presiding: Kristin Pickering, Tennessee Technological Univ.

1. "Assessing a Progress Report of Students' Online Presence in a Junior-Level Online Business Writing Class," William Christopher Brown, Univ. of Minnesota, Crookston
2. "Reflective Assessment Practices in the Outplacement Industry," Oliver Brearey, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
3. "Oral and Written Business Communication Skills: Developing Assessment Genres to Meet Student, Faculty, and (Yes, Even) Workplace Needs," Paullett R. Golden, San Jacinto Coll.; Kristin Pickering

66. The Austin Music Scene and Its Publics: Willie Nelson, Janis Joplin, Doug Sahm, and Friends
Thursday, 7 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 203, JW Marriott
A special session
Presiding: Martha Nell Smith, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
Martha Nell Smith's Annotation: Kimmie Rhodes and Bobby Earl Smith will perform a bit of Austin music at this session. Y'all come listen, sing-a-long, enjoy!
Kimmie Rhodes Mix (including Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings)
Speakers: Thomas Barker, Univ. of Alberta; Ben Child, Colgate Univ.; Tanya E. Clement, Univ. of Texas, Austin; Alice Echols, Univ. of Southern California; Kimmie Rhodes, musician; Bobby Earl Smith, musician
Thomas Barker's Annotation: Keep the groove happening after the session by heading down the street to Ray's Backstage to hear Bruce (Bruno) Clarke (MLA member and former bassist for Sha Na Na) and Tommy Barker perform

Session Description: A widely known and profoundly influential part of Austin’s literatures—“writing” off, from, and about itself—is "that ʼ70s show," the outlaw music that radically changed soundscapes. “Country music has never been the same,” and neither has rock and roll. Panelists focus on the political, social, and cultural significance of Austin music.

89. Troubling Desire, Troubling Tradition in the Transatlantic Fin de Siglo
Thursday, 7 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 310, JW Marriott
A special session
Presiding: Sarah Moody, Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

1. "Andróginos: Male Friendship, Effeminacy, and Erotica in the Novels of Clarín, Galdós, and Pardo Bazán," Mehl Penrose, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
2. "Fin-de-Siglo Porfirian Mexico: 'The Woman Question' in Mariano Azuela’s María Luisa (1907)," Julio Enriquez-Ornelas, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville
3. "Feminine Erotics Confront Modernismo: Violence and Parody in Agustini and Cáceres," Sarah Moody
4. "Graziella Garbalosa's La gozadora del dolor ('She Who Relishes Pain'; 1922)," Nancy Anne LaGreca, Univ. of Oklahoma

92. The Myth of Post-canonicity: Early Modern Women Writers
Thursday, 7 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 6A, ACC
A special session
Presiding: Lara A. Dodds, Mississippi State Univ.
Speakers: Kimberly Anne Coles, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Michelle M. Dowd, Univ. of North Carolina, Greensboro; Ula Klein, Texas A&M International Univ.; Rebecca Laroche, Univ. of Colorado, Colorado Springs; Mihoko Suzuki, Univ. of Miami
Responding: Wendy L. Wall, Northwestern Univ.

Session Description: Panelists address the obstacles and opportunities for the study and teaching of early modern women given current disciplinary and institutional circumstances. The recovery of early modern women's writing has been very successful, but by some measures women's creative activities remain marginalized within the profession. What are the causes and consequences? What are strategies for change?

115. The Futures of Shelley's Triumph
Thursday, 7 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 4BC, ACC
Program arranged by the Keats-Shelley Association of America
Presiding: Joel Robert Faflak, Univ. of Western Ontario

1. "As If That Look Must Be the Last," Jacques Khalip, Brown Univ.
2. "Rhymes of Wonder: Otherness without Distortion," Elizabeth Fay, Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston
3. "'A Veil of Light Is Drawn': Percy Shelley's Minor Cinema," Forest Pyle, Univ. of Oregon
Responding: Orrin N. C. Wang, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

171. Post-Civil-Rights Publics
Thursday, 7 January, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 19A, ACC
A special session
Presiding: Jeffrey McCune, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

1. "‘Backwater Blues’: Bessie Smith, Performance, and the Politics of Medicine among Black Publics," Julius Fleming, Jr., Univ. of Maryland, College Park
2. "‘All Welfare Stories Are Not Grim’: Charles Wright’s Trickster Ethnography of the United States Welfare State," Irvin Hunt, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana
3. "Performance/Text: Integrating Toni Cade Bambara’s Multiple Publics," Shaundra Myers, Northwestern Univ.
4. "Citizen and You," Kinohi Nishikawa, Princeton Univ.

183. Challenging Fatwas, Exploring Sufism: Islam in Maghrebi Francophone Literature and Film
Thursday, 7 January, 7:00–8:15 p.m., 305, JW Marriott
A special session

1. "La vie sexuelle d’un islamiste à Paris; or, Give Me an Alternative Narrative, Please!," Valérie K. Orlando, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
2. "L’islam comme lieu de mémoire et mémoire des lieux dans les romans Marrakech, Marrakech, lumière d’exil de Rajae Benchemsi et La répudiée de Touria Oulehri," Latifa Zoulagh, Univ. of Oklahoma
3. "Ibn Abi Tāhir’s Balāghāt al-Nisā’ as Intertext in Assia Djebar’s Loin de Médine," Jamila Davey, Univ. of Texas, Austin
4. "On Landscapes, Identity, and Gender in Merzak Allouache’s Le repenti and Nouri Bouzid’s Making Of: Metacinema and Terrorism in the Early Twenty-First Century," Mary E. McCullough, Samford Univ.

January 8, 2016

214. Racialized Publics: Law and Citizenship in Antebellum American Literary Studies
Friday, 8 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 8B, ACC
A special session
Presiding: Srabanti Munia Bhaumik, Emory Univ.
Speakers: Benjamin Bascom, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana; Srabanti Munia Bhaumik; Eric Cheyfitz, Cornell Univ.; Janet Neary, Hunter Coll., City Univ. of New York; Hoang Phan, Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst
Responding: Edlie L. Wong, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
Session Description: Panelists consider the topic of law and citizenship in antebellum American literary studies, with the objective of comparing methods for accounting for race and restrictions on rights. Discussion broaches how to read and teach the legal history of race through an account of print culture, including African American newspapers and antislavery genres.

238. Science and Literary Discourse
Friday, 8 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 10A, ACC
Program arranged by the forum CLCS 18th-Century
Presiding: Helen Thompson, Northwestern Univ.
1. "Human Nature and Honeybee Culture: Reading Mandeville's Fable of the Bees," Bryan Alkemeyer, Coll. of Wooster
2. "After Belatedness," Tita Chico, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
3. "A Sense of Place and the Uncertainty of the Self," Jeongoh Kim, Vanderbilt Univ.
4. "The Embryology of Poetic Form and the Limits of Materialism," Dustin D. Stewart, Columbia Univ.

248. The Afterlife of Popular Children's Culture Icons
Friday, 8 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 203, JW Marriott
Program arranged by the Children's Literature Association
Presiding: Paul Cote, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
1. "From Madcap to Mourning: The Muppets after Henson," Paul Cote
2. "The Afterlife of the Boy Who Would Not Grow Up," Carrie Sickmann Han, Indiana Univ.–Purdue Univ., Indianapolis
3. "How Do You Solve a Problem like Mickey Mouse?" Peter Kunze, Univ. of Texas, Austin
4. "'His Active Little Crutch': The Adaptations and Influence of Tiny Tim," Alexandra Valint, Univ. of Southern Mississippi

293. Brecht, Surveillance, Visibility
Friday, 8 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 201, JW Marriott
Program arranged by the International Brecht Society
Presiding: Vera S. Stegmann, Lehigh Univ.
1. "Breaking the Fourth Wall of Biometric Surveillance: Brechtian Aesthetics in Surveillance Arts Activism," Elise Morrison, Yale Univ.
2. "Alienated and Relaxed: Immersed Spectators at Work and Onstage," James Ball, Texas A&M Univ., College Station
3. "Performance at a Smart Intersection: Surveillance, Information Technologies, and the Space of Brecht’s 'Street Scene,'" James Martin Harding, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
Responding: Theodore Franks Rippey, Bowling Green State Univ.

375. The Past, Present, and Future of American Literature: Hubbell Lifetime Achievement Awardees Speak
Friday, 8 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 10B, ACC
Program arranged by the American Literature Section
Presiding: Carrie Tirado Bramen, Univ. at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York
Speakers: Lawrence I. Buell, Harvard Univ.; Frances Smith Foster, Emory Univ.; Robert S. Levine, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Cecelia Tichi, Vanderbilt Univ.
Session Description: This panel addresses the specific challenges facing American literary studies today. As critics debate the post-American, postcanonical, transnational, hemispheric, oceanic, and the planetary, the parameters of the field remain in flux. One way to address this is by reflecting on the past and posing a question inspired by Ken Warren’s book: What was American literature?

384. Legacies of the Latin American Boom: Recollections and Reconfigurations
Friday, 8 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 302, JW Marriott
A special session
Presiding: Lucille Kerr, Northwestern Univ.
Speakers: Laura Demaría, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Roberto-Ignacio Díaz, Univ. of Southern California; Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Suzanne Jill Levine, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara; María Rueda, Smith Coll.; Marcy Ellen Schwartz, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick
Responding: Lucille Kerr
Session Description: Focusing on literary history, readership, marketing, and translation, panelists offer in-depth discussion about the legacies of the Latin American Boom, the 1960s–70s literary and cultural phenomenon that inserted Latin American writers such as Cortázar, Fuentes, García Márquez, and Vargas Llosa into global cultural markets and also engaged them in Cold War politics.

388. Postcolonial Affect
Friday, 8 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 18B, ACC
Program arranged by the forum TC Postcolonial Studies
Presiding: Nicholas Mainey Brown, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago
1. "Ecology of Intimacies: An Ethics, Aesthetics, and Politics of Reading The Hungry Tide and The Whale Caller," Sangeeta Ray, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
2. "City Genre, Urban Government," John Marx, Univ. of California, Davis
3. "Affecting History," Vilashini Cooppan, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz

397. Constitutions and Literature: Comparative and Global Horizons
Friday, 8 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 202, JW Marriott
Program arranged by the forum TC Law and the Humanities
Presiding: Peter Mallios, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
1. "Constitutional Double Consciousness: Law, Literature, and Comparative Fictions of Intent," Hoang Phan, Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst
2. "International Law, Local Remedy: Global Politics of the Laguna Pueblo Constitution in Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony," Audrey Golden, Coe Coll.
3. "The Poet as Constitutionalist: Francisco Zarco, Popular Sovereignty, and the 1857 Mexican Constitution," Ignacio Sanchez Prado, Washington Univ. in St. Louis
4. "'Immature, Uneducated or Uncivilized Persons': Conceptualizations of 'Weak' and 'Strong' Readers in South African Constitutional Law," Ted Laros, Radboud Univ.

January 9, 2016

449A. Critical Intersectionalities of Race and Sexuality: Aesthetics, Limits, Dangers, Opportunities
Saturday, 9 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 403, JW Marriott
Program arranged by the MLA Committee on the Literatures of People of Color in the United States and Canada and the GL/Q Caucus for the Modern Languages
Presiding: Marcellus Blount, Columbia Univ.
Speakers: La Marr Jurelle Bruce, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Erica Edwards, Univ. of California, Riverside; Karen Jaime, Cornell Univ.; Victor Roman Mendoza, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Marcia Ochoa, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz; Chandan Reddy, Univ. of Washington, Seattle
Session Description: Panelists revisit the significance of Kimberle Crenshaw’s 1989 articulation of intersectionality, in the context of modern-day literary and cultural studies, to highlight conversations among race, ethnicities, and sexualities.

499. Revisiting Dialogue
Saturday, 9 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 14, ACC
A special session
Presiding: William A. Cohen, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
Speakers: Vera J. Camden, Kent State Univ., Kent; William A. Cohen; Laura Green, Northeastern Univ.; Audrey Jaffe, Univ. of Toronto; Mary Ann O'Farrell, Texas A&M Univ., College Station
Session Description: Asking whether dialogue has been prematurely relegated to the category of the familiar, the uncomplicated, and the known, speakers raise questions about or instances of dialogue in the novel that destabilize our too-familiar sense of its place and work. We want to discuss with other scholars the question of what offices dialogue serves for the novel.

509. Transgender Studies, Ecology, and the Environmental Humanities
Saturday, 9 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 7, ACC
Program arranged by the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment
Presiding: Clare Echterling, Univ. of Kansas; Nicole Seymour, California State Univ., Fullerton
1. "'Got Hormones?': Fearing Transsexual Reproductive Ecocatastrophe in the Nation's Milk, Meat, and Mammals," Bailey Kier, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
2. "'With a Hand to Re-arrange Us': Labor and the Postnatural in Contemporary Transgender Pastoral," Michael Mlekoday, Indiana Univ., Bloomington
3. "Transpastoral Ecology, Sustainable Tomboyism," Wan-Chuan Kao, Washington and Lee Univ.
4. "Trans-ing the Environmental Humanities," Nicole Seymour

556. Autobiography as Education: Adams and Beyond
Saturday, 9 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., 5C, ACC
Program arranged by the forums LLC Late-19th- and Early-20th-Century American and GS Life Writing
Presiding: John Matteson, John Jay Coll. of Criminal Justice, City Univ. of New York; Edlie L. Wong, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
1. "Educators as Autobiographers," Jessica Wells Cantiello, Univ. of Southern California
2. "Autobiography, Education: Henry Adams and the Definition of a Genre," William M. Decker, Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater
3. "The Education of Henry Adams and Self-Discovery through Data Collection," Elizabeth Rodrigues, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Responding: Joanne Jacobson, Yeshiva Univ.

611. Literature and the Landscape of American Suburbs
Saturday, 9 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 5B, ACC
A special session
Presiding: Randy Ontiveros, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
1. "Suburban Literature and the Appraisal of Race," Adrienne Brown, Univ. of Chicago
2. "Suburban Pastoral in Langston Hughes’s 'Horn of Plenty,'" Peter Monacell, Columbia Coll., MO
3. "Domestic Labor, Domestic Longing: The Suburbs in Latino/a Writing," Randy Ontiveros
4. "'Twenty-First-Century Forty-Niners Digging for Gold': The Suburban Florida of Eddie Huang's Fresh off the Boat," Melissa Phruksachart, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York
For papers, visit umd.box.com/mla2016 after 7 Dec.

619. Queer Crips across Time
Saturday, 9 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 18D, ACC
Program arranged by the forums TC Disability Studies and TC Sexuality Studies
Presiding: Allison Hobgood, Willamette Univ.; Martha Nell Smith, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
Speakers: Cam Awkward-Rich, Stanford Univ.; Simone Chess, Wayne State Univ.; Petra Kuppers, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Saralyn Russell, Univ. of Toronto; Jarred Wiehe, Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs
Responding: Ellen Samuels, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison
For abstracts, write to ahobgood@willamette.edu.
Session Description: Presentations on queer, disabled disciplinary crossings in theory and practice. Speakers discuss queer-crip (pre)histories of embodiment, desire, and language, with an emphasis on the pasts, presents, and futures of queer-crip temporality, history, and sociality.

641. Reexamining New World Encounters: Where Do We Go from Here?
Saturday, 9 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 18A, ACC
Program arranged by the forum CLCS Renaissance and Early Modern and the Forum LLC Early American
Presiding: Matt Cohen, Univ. of Texas, Austin
Speakers: Emily M. Garcia, Northeastern Illinois Univ.; Jeffrey Glover, Loyola Univ., Chicago; Annette Kolodny, Univ. of Arizona; Andrew Newman, Stony Brook Univ., State Univ. of New York; Luis Fernando Restrepo, Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville
Responding: Ralph Bauer, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
Session Description:
Almost twenty-five years after the publication of Stephen Greenblatt’s seminal collection New World Encounters, panelists take stock of recent developments and suggest future directions, new theoretical perspectives, untapped archives, and cross-disciplinary methodologies in the study of intercultural encounters in the early Americas up to 1850.

643. Igniting Hemispheric Scholarship in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries
Saturday, 9 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., 301, JW Marriott
A special session
Presiding: Kimberly O'Neill, Quinnipiac Univ.
Speakers: Antonio Barrenechea, Univ. of Mary Washington; Chandrima Chakraborty, McMaster Univ.; Harris Feinsod, Northwestern Univ.; Claire Frances Fox, Univ. of Iowa; Amy K. King, Georgia Inst. of Tech.; Stephen Park, Univ. of Texas, Rio Grande Valley; Ana Patricia Rodríguez, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
Session Description: This panel promotes exchange among contemporary hemispheric literary scholars. Panelists present five-minute ignite talks meant to familiarize both specialists and nonspecialists with our research projects: our questions, archives, methods, and challenges. During discussion, audience members are invited to participate in this effort to build community among hemisphericists.

685. Women, Violence, and New African Cinema
Saturday, 9 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., 208, JW Marriott
Program arranged by the forums LLC African since 1990 and LLC Francophone
Presiding: Valérie K. Orlando, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
1. "Feminism and Neoliberal Self-Fashioning in the Films of Shirley Frimpong-Manso," Carmela Garritano, Texas A&M Univ., College Station
2. "Aftershocks of the Egyptian Revolution: Feminism in Hanan Abdallah’s Documentary In the Shadow of a Man," Touria Khannous, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge
3. "Violence and Vulnerability: Terrorism and the Female Protagonist in Contemporary Algerian Cinema," Maria Flood, Cornell Univ.
4. "Women after War: Films from Kenya and Burkina Faso," Joya F. Uraizee, Saint Louis Univ.

692. MLA Awards Ceremony
Saturday, 9 January, 7:00 p.m., Lone Star D, JW Marriott
Presiding: Roland Greene, Stanford Univ., MLA President
1. Roland Greene will announce the newly elected honorary fellows.
2. Remarks by William Adams, National Endowment for the Humanities
3. Kwame Anthony Appiah, New York Univ., MLA First Vice President, will present the William Riley Parker Prize; James Russell Lowell Prize; MLA Prize for a First Book; Kenneth W. Mildenberger Prize; Katherine Singer Kovacs Prize; Morton N. Cohen Award; MLA Prize for a Scholarly Edition; Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for Comparative Literary Studies; Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for French and Francophone Studies; Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for Studies in Slavic Languages and Literatures; Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for a Translation of a Scholarly Study of Literature; Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for Italian Studies; Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Publication Award for a Manuscript in Italian Literary Studies; Lois Roth Award; William Sanders Scarborough Prize; and MLA Prize in United States Latina and Latino and Chicana and Chicano Literary and Cultural Studies.
4. Rosemary G. Feal, MLA, will present the MLA International Bibliography Fellowship Awards.
5. Rosemary G. Feal will announce the recipients of the seal of approval from the Committee on Scholarly Editions.
6. Sonja Rae Fritzsche, Illinois Wesleyan Univ., ADFL President, will present the ADFL Award for Distinguished Service to the Profession to Malcolm Alan Compitello, Univ. of Arizona, Tucson.
7. Remarks by Malcolm Alan Compitello
8. Kent Cartwright, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, ADE President, will present the ADE Francis Andrew March Award to John David Guillory, New York Univ.
9. Remarks by John David Guillory
Reception immediately following.

January 10, 2015

716. Latin American Colonial Literature and Its Public
Sunday, 10 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 302, JW Marriott
A special session
Presiding: Eyda M. Merediz, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
Speakers: Rolena Adorno, Yale Univ.; Rocío Cortés, Univ. of Wisconsin, Oshkosh; Regina L. Harrison, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Yolanda M. Martinez–San Miguel, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick; Eyda M. Merediz; Veronica A. Salles-Reese, Georgetown Univ.
Session Description: Focusing on the pedagogical challenges faced by colonial Latin American literature, panelists discuss classroom practices to address the technological demands of the twenty-first century by exploring strategies to create interdisciplinary spaces, engage a visually driven public, decenter presentism, reexamine utilitarian knowledge, and redefine hybrid courses.

730. Psychoanalysis and "Race"
Sunday, 10 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 8C, ACC
Program arranged by the forum TC Psychology, Psychoanalysis, and Literature
Presiding: Ben Sifuentes-Jauregui, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick
1. "'No Wiggles in the Dark of Her Soul': On Black Neurosis, Art, and Murder," La Marr Jurelle Bruce, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
2. "The Pathology of Blackness," David Marriott, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz
3. "Richard Wright’s Blues: Oppression, (Ab)Normality, and the Science of the Mind in Frantz Fanon’s and Fredric Wertham’s Metapsychological Thought," Gabriel Mendes, Univ. of California, San Diego
4. "Affects of Difference: Reading Race through Psychoanalysis and Performance," Michelle Ann Stephens, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick

735. Romantic Sovereignty
Sunday, 10 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 5B, ACC
Program arranged by the forum LLC English Romantic and the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism
Presiding: Mark E. Canuel, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago
1. "Kleist, Haiti, and the Vicissitudes of Sovereignty," Kir A. Kuiken, Univ. at Albany, State Univ. of New York
2. "Play Time: Austen, Byron, and the Place of the Nonsovereign," Orrin N. C. Wang, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
3. "Anthropomorphism, Anthropocene," Sara Guyer, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

740. Deranged Verse: Intermedia Arrangement in Seventeenth-Century England
Sunday, 10 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 5C, ACC
A special session
Presiding: Claire M. L. Bourne, Virginia Commonwealth Univ.
1. "Tracing and Arranging Donne," Megan Heffernan, DePaul Univ.
2. "Milton the Lady, Milton the Cavalier," Scott A. Trudell, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
3. "‘Disjoyn’d and Yet United Too’: Antony and Cleopatra, Movable Scenes, and Play Reading for Place," Claire M. L. Bourne
Responding: Reid Barbour, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

747. America(s) imaginada(s): Diasporic Latin American Literatures and Their Publics
Sunday, 10 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., 6B, ACC
A special session
Presiding: Alicia Ivonne Estrada, California State Univ., Northridge; Paul M. Worley, Western Carolina Univ.
1. "Memory and the Resistance of Erasure in Maya Border-Crossing Stories," Alicia Ivonne Estrada
2. "‘Blame My Genes’: Multilangued Political Histories of Zapotec Immigration in Lamberto Roque Hernández," Paul M. Worley
3. "Arrested Assimilation: Reconciling Past and Future in Autobiographical Immigrant Narratives by United States Central Americans," Yajaira M. Padilla, Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville
4. "Latino Diasporas in Contact: Cristina Henríquez and Alfredo Véa, Jr." Ana Patricia Rodríguez, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

826. Constitutions and Literature: United States Contexts and Theory
Sunday, 10 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 6B, ACC
Program arranged by the forum TC Law and the Humanities
Presiding: Peter Mallios, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
1. "Defamation in Fiction: Judicial Ways of Envisioning the Audience to Harmful Speech," Richard Weisberg, Yeshiva Univ., New York
2. "Too Much and Not Enough: The Motif of the Three-Fifths Clause and the Elusive Temptation of Equality in African American Literature," Imani Perry, Princeton Univ.
3. "The Constitution as Composition: Carl Schmitt and Walter Benjamin on the Representational Nature of Political Order," David Pan, Univ. of California, Irvine
4. "Characteristic Writing and the Constitution in Early America," Leila Mansouri, Univ. of California, Berkeley

831. Sounds of the South
Sunday, 10 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 19B, ACC
Program arranged by the forum LLC Southern United States
Presiding: Rebecca Mark, Tulane Univ.
1. "The 'Free Voice of the South': Cuba’s Revolutionary Radio and Hemispheric Activism," Elizabeth Rodriguez Fielder, Univ. of Mississippi
2. "‘Not Intended for My Ears’: Slavery, Surveillance, and Auditory Epistemologies in Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl," Julius Fleming, Jr., Univ. of Maryland, College Park
3. "Blessed Graceland Whispers to Me: Sounding and Imaging a Postmodern Pastoral South in Buddy Jewell's 'Sweet Southern Comfort,'" Adam Gussow, Univ. of Mississippi

834. In Theory: American Literature since 1966
Sunday, 10 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., 14, ACC
Program arranged by the forum LLC 20th- and 21st-Century American
Presiding: Mark Goble, Univ. of California, Berkeley
1. "American Theory," Walter Benn Michaels, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago
2. "Fiction and the Postracial Imaginary," Susan Koshy, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana
3. "After the Ideologeme," Lee Konstantinou, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

 

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