ENGL479O - Selected Topics in English and American Literature after 1800; Postcolonialism
Syllabus:
Section(s):
0101 - James Maffie
Postcolonialists maintain that modern European and European diaspora scholarship – ranging from social sciences such as anthropology, psychology, and political science to humanities such as comparative religion, literary studies, history, and philosophy – has been, its self-proclaimed universalism notwithstanding, defined by Eurocentricism. As a corrective, postcolonialists recommend decentering and provincializing -- some times also called “decolonizing” -- European (Western) scholarship as well as developing “scholarship from the multiple standpoints and voices of those heretofore excluded from world discourse.
 
After examining general issues in recent debates about postcolonalism and decolonialism, we focus on attempts at decolonizing such fields as anthropology, cartography, religious studies, philosophy, history, and the social sciences generally as well as recent attempts to develop scholarship from the multiple standpoints and voices of those heretofore excluded from world discourse.
 
Authors include: Edward Said, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Franz Fanon, Talal Asad, Kwasi Wiredu, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Uma Narayan, Walter Mignolo, Enrique Dussel, Aimé Césaire, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o, Oyèróké Oyêwùmi, Vine Deloria, Jr., George Tinker, Dipesh Chakrabarty, Robert Bernasconi, Marcelo Fernández Osco and others.
 
Prerequisites: Two English courses in literature; or permission of ARHU-English department.
Note: Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs.