Marshall Grossman Lecture Series

Marshall Grossman Lecture Series

Renaissance Reckonings was created by Professor Marion Trousdale in 1992. With support from the College of Arts and Humanities and from the Department of English, it has run continuously since then, becoming one of the English Department’s most successful annual endeavors and helping to establish the department’s medieval and Renaissance program as one of the best in the country.

Offering presentations and seminars by many of the most distinguished scholars working in the medieval and early modern periods, the series plays a valuable role in the intellectual life of our faculty, in the professional development of our graduate students, in our interaction within the College and with local universities, and in broadcasting our department’s strengths to the profession at large. Since the passing of our beloved colleague Marshall Grossman, the department and the Renaissance area group together decided to rename the series as The Marshall Grossman Lecture Series in honor of him. In 2012, we concluded a successful fundraising campaign to make sure the series continues to flourish.

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June 5, 2020
This spring, Liam Thomas Daley presented material at seminars hosted by the Shakespeare Association of American and the Folger Shakespeare Library.
June 5, 2020
In May of this year, Liam Thomas Daley helped to co-organize a series of online readings of Renaissance history plays for Brave Spirits Theatre Company, directing one of the plays and providing the dramaturgy for two more.
June 3, 2020
Professor Emeritus Kent Cartwright’s book-in-progress, “Shakespeare and the Comedy of Enchantment,” has been put under contract by Oxford University Press.  He expects to submit the manuscript in July. 
June 3, 2020
This Spring, Michael Olmert was selected to serve as an affiliate with the School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies, lectured on J.L. Carr.'s novel, A Month in the Country, and peer reviewed an article for Speculum.
January 28, 2020
Michael Olmert was interviewed for a video about Caryl Churchill's play ESCAPED ALONE (2017). The video was shown on a loop in the Signature Theatre's lobby during the run of the play in September-October 2019.
January 9, 2020
Faculty, graduate students, and alumni present current research findings at the annual Modern Language Association convention in Seattle, WA, from 9-12 January.
December 5, 2019
Professor Emeritus Kent Cartwright has been invited to be a Visiting Fellow at the University of Pisa, Italy, March 10-April 10, 2020.  During his residency, he will give two talks about Shakespearean comedy, conduct research, and meet with faculty.
September 13, 2019
Dr. David Carroll Simon has been promoted to the rank of Associate Professor with tenure. His first book, Light without Heat: The Observational Mood from Bacon to Milton (Cornell University Press, 2018), argues for the importance of careless inattention and open-ended receptivity to the literary and philosophical experiments of England's scientific revolution. He is now at work on a study of misogyny and comic experience in early modern literature and philosophy. Dr. Simon joined the University of Maryland faculty in Fall 2018.
September 13, 2019
Dr. Scott Trudell has been promoted to the rank of Associate Professor with tenure. His research focuses on early modern poetry, drama, music, and pageantry, as well as media studies, sound studies, performance studies, gender studies, and theories of the lyric. He is the author of Unwritten Poetry: Song, Performance, and Media in Early Modern England (Oxford UP, 2019); he has published in journals including Shakespeare Quarterly and Studies in Philology; and he is a co-principal investigator of Early Modern Songscapes, an interdisciplinary digital humanities project on the musical performance of English Renaissance poetry.
September 13, 2019
Memorial services for each Virginia Beauchamp and Stanley Plumly will take place this month.